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Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Archives

Debt doesn't just go away; Chapter 13 bankruptcy may help

The temptation to do nothing can be great. At first, it seems easier to just ignore the problem rather than deal with it. Bills go unopened, the phone goes unanswered and the tension mounts. Sometimes the extent of financial problems that the Kentucky resident is facing is unknown. It is time to take action, and many times, Chapter 13 bankruptcy is the most appropriate action to handle the growing financial problem.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy or debt consolidation?

Credit card debt can quickly add up. A new skirt here, dinner out there, and the end result can easily be hundreds of dollars in unplanned purchases. This on top of minor financial set-backs, and the average Kentucky consumer suddenly finds himself or herself thousands of dollars in debt. For some, budgeting is the answer; however, others will need to look at more extensive measures such as debt consolidation or perhaps Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy can help one become more financially stable

It is easy to get behind financially. For some Kentucky residents, one or two unexpected expenses can wreak havoc on the budget. In such circumstances, there is no way to pay everything that is due. This often causes one to get further and further behind with no way break the cycle. Fortunately, Chapter 13 bankruptcy offers a way to make the necessary changes and become financially stable once again.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy may be appropriate option

Life happens. People get sick, and bills pile up. The simple fact is that almost every Kentucky resident will face a financial crisis at one time or another. For some, filing for either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy is the answer.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy may save family home

As financial problems mount, decisions regarding which bills to pay and which bills to let lapse often become a topic of conversation for a family. Fear of losing the family home is often a primary concern when Kentucky residents face significant financial problems. One way to possibly solve the dilemma over which bills to pay and as a way to save the family home is to file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

What to do after filing Chapter 13 bankrutpcy

Decisions have been made, paperwork has been filed and the Kentucky resident can finally begin to breathe a sigh of relief. For many, the most difficult part of a Chapter 13 bankruptcy in federal court is taking that first step and deciding to put an end to the financial struggle. Now that the process has begun, what needs to be done?

Stop creditors with a Chapter 13 or 7 bankruptcy filing

When one is facing financial difficulties, dealing with creditors can be a nightmare. Unfortunately, creditors can be relentless in their efforts to get the money owed them. How can one make it stop? For some Kentucky residents, Chapter 13 or 7 bankruptcies may be what is needed to get some relief.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy fundamentals

The decision has finally been made and the paperwork has been filed. One Kentucky resident has come to the conclusion that a life of mounting debt is not the answer. In order to get out from under the increasing debt, this individual has filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy. But, now that the decision has been made, the forms completed and the paperwork filed, what comes next?

Chapter 13 bankruptcy -- advantages and disadvantages

Like most things, each form of bankruptcy has its advantages and disadvantages. A careful analysis of these, along with guidance from one's legal advisor, can help in determining the best choice for a particular situation. Many Kentucky residents find that filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy is the appropriate option.

Can you discharge tax debt through bankruptcy?

The federal income tax filing deadline is less than two weeks away. If you have already completed and filed your return, congratulations! You don’t have to worry about the myriad of forms, calculations and deductions relating to it for at least another year. If you have not, hopefully you understand how to extend your filing deadline or at least how to establish a plan to pay your tax debt over time.